Tips to help achieve your study goals

STUDYING can be difficult, even for avid students. It often involves a lot of reading, making notes and calculations. But, sitting at a desk for hours on end is not always the most productive method to study. It is important consider the long term and short term goals, how to achieve them and personal learning styles. Making and getting the most out of study is important and whatdegreewhichuniversity.com says students should learn towards the goal they have in mind. The website said goals should be based on the student’s  ideals no matter…

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The 6 WORST Ways to Study for Tests

Most of us don’t spend a whole lot of time thinking about our study habits or lack thereof until a low score on a critical exam knocks us into reality or a threatening “thou will not pass unless” warning shocks us straight. We turn over the bad grade or obsess about the warning for days and weeks on end, all the while trying to make sense of the very blurry lines between outright procrastination and our potential. I want to say here that stellar grades and A1 test scores are not the…

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Expert’s exam study tips for matrics

An education expert has given some helpful tips on how Grade 12s can prepare for the crucial papers. The June and trial exam marks play a huge role in pupils’ applications for tertiary studies. Nola Payne, with the Independent Institute for Education, has encouraged matrics to turn social media off while burning the midnight oil. It’s also out with the clutter. “Something to consider using is the Pomodoro technique. You can use an egg timer. You set it for 25 minutes, working flat-out for that period of time until the buzzer…

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Advice Series: Students Share Study Tips

For this installment of our summer advice series for incoming freshmen, Meredith students share their study tips. “Find a spot where you can focus. There are so many places where students can go on campus to do homework or study. I’ve studied in the dining hall, classrooms, and the library. Students can reserve rooms in the library for study groups if that’s helpful. Finding a place to study is important so you can make sure you are able to focus and succeed academically. —Kaitlin Toxey, ’18, a Psychology and Communication major from Raleigh,…

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Young e-cigarette users more likely to become tobacco users, says new study

A recent UK study suggests that teenagers who have tried an e-cigarette are more likely to go on to smoke tobacco cigarettes. The study was led by the University of Stirling along with researchers from the Unversities of St Andrews and Edinburgh, and ScotCen. The team looked at pupils at four Scottish secondary schools aged between 11 and 18 years old, surveying the participants in 2015 and then again 12 months later. They found in the initial 2015 survey that among the 2,125 pupils who had never smoked a cigarette,…

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How we believe meat is raised may influence its taste: Study

Our beliefs about how animals are raised – whether on ‘factory farms’ or in more humane conditions – can shape our meat eating experience and influence its taste, a new study has found. Researchers from Northeastern University in the US paired identical meat samples with different descriptions and then reported on participants’ eating experiences. They found that meat samples paired with descriptions of animals raised on factory farms looked, smelled and tasted less pleasant to study participants than meat samples paired with descriptions of animals raised on humane farms. Participants’…

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Study shows breastfeeding may reduce the risk of Multiple Sclerosis in women

Mothers who breastfeed for at least 15 months over one or more pregnancies may be 53 per cent less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with those who do not breastfeed at all or do so for up to four months, a study has claimed. MS is a disease in which the immune system eats away at the protective covering of nerves. The findings showed that women with MS have significantly fewer relapses, or attacks, during pregnancy or while they are breastfeeding exclusively. “Among the many other benefits to…

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Autistic females face greater difficulty with daily tasks: Study

Women and girls with autism may face greater challenges with real world planning, organisation and other daily living skills, than boys, an analysis has showed. The findings showed that girls were struggling more with these independence skills of executive function including the ability to make a plan, get organised, and follow through on the plan as needed-and adaptive skills-ability to perform basic daily tasks like getting up and dressed or making small talk. “Our goal was to look at real world skills, not just the diagnostic behaviours we use clinically…

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Ozone pollution tied to cardiovascular health: Study

Exposure to ozone, a powerful greenhouse gas and a widespread air pollutant in many major cities, may cause cardiovascular disease such as heart attack, high blood pressure and stroke, according to a new study of Chinese adults. Ozone is a pollutant formed through a chemical reaction that occurs when sunlight interacts with nitrogen oxides and other organic compounds that are generated by coal-burning, vehicle exhaust and some natural sources. It has long been associated with adverse health effects in children and adults, Xinhua reported on Monday. “We know that ozone…

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Language lessons for your baby may start in womb: Study

Love to speak to your unborn baby? Well he or she can typically distinguish the difference between sounds used in various languages even a month before being born, an interesting study has shown. The study showed that foetuses can hear things, including speech, in the womb, although the voice is muffled. In the study, the foetal heart rates changed when they heard the unfamiliar, rhythmically distinct language (Japanese) after having heard a passage of English speech, while their heart rates did not change when they were presented with a second…

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