Parents, beware. 3 hours of TV daily may up risk of diabetes in your kids

Parents, take note! Being glued to television or video games for more than three hours a day may put your children at increased risk of developing diabetes, a study warns. Researchers found that both adiposity, which describes total body fat, and insulin resistance, which occurs when cells fail to respond to insulin, were affected by longer hours of watching television and using computers. “Our findings suggest that reducing screen time may be beneficial in reducing type 2 diabetes risk factors, in both boys and girls, from an early age,” said…

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Study shows breastfeeding may reduce the risk of Multiple Sclerosis in women

Mothers who breastfeed for at least 15 months over one or more pregnancies may be 53 per cent less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with those who do not breastfeed at all or do so for up to four months, a study has claimed. MS is a disease in which the immune system eats away at the protective covering of nerves. The findings showed that women with MS have significantly fewer relapses, or attacks, during pregnancy or while they are breastfeeding exclusively. “Among the many other benefits to…

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Artificial sweeteners may not be risk free

People hoping to lose a few pounds by substituting artificial sweeteners for regular sugar may end up disappointed, suggests a fresh look at past research. The review of 37 studies suggests the use of so-called non-nutritive sweeteners could be linked to weight gain and other undesirable outcomes like high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. “From all that research, there was no consistent evidence of a long term benefit from the sweetener, but there was evidence for weight gain and increased risks of other cardiometabolic outcomes,” said lead author Meghan Azad, of the University…

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Long Work Hours May Pose Heart Risk, Here Are 6 Foods Which Can Help Cut Down Stress

A recent study published in the European Heart Journal, comes as a wake-up call to all those who have been working extra hours at their workplace. As per the British study, spending long hours at work may increase the risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm — known as atrial fibrillation — as well as contribute to the development of stroke and heart failure, according to a study.   The study compared to people who worked a normal week of between 35-40 hours and those who worked 55 hours or…

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Do you spend a lot of hours in office? It may increase irregular heart rhythm risk

Working long hours affects your health in many ways. It affects your eyes, and can even lead to cancer . Now, a new research has shown that it may increase the risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm – known as atrial fibrillation – as well as contribute to the development of stroke and heart failure. The findings showed that, compared to people who worked a normal week of between 35-40 hours, those who worked 55 hours or more were approximately 40% more likely to develop atrial fibrillation. “A 40% increased extra risk…

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Restless legs syndrome ups risk of sleep disturbances in pregnancy

According to a new study, pregnant women who have restless legs syndrome (RLS) are twice as likely to experience poor sleep quality, poor daytime function and excessive daytime sleepiness. RLS is an irresistible urge to move your legs typically in the evenings. The results showed that 36% of women in their third trimester had RLS, and half of the women with RLS, had moderate to severe symptoms. The study found a positive dose-response relationship between RLS severity and the sleep-wake disturbances. Lead study author Galit Levi Dunietz, from the University…

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Fermented red clover taken during menopause cuts risk of mood swings, bone loss

Here’s some good news for women undergoing menopause. A study has found that fermented-red clover extract can effectively reduce the number and severity of hot flushes, hormonal swings and bone loss experienced during menopause. The study also found that the extract prevents the normally accelerated menopausal bone loss, which affects one in three women over the age of 50. Researcher Max Norman Tandrup Lambert said that it is the fermentation process of the red clover extract that makes the difference, as the lactic acid fermentation increases the bioavailability of the…

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Ditch the artificial sweetener. It may increase risk of obesity and heart disease

Artificial sweeteners are substitutes for sugar that provides a sweet taste like that of sugar while containing significantly less food energy. Previous research has found that consuming artificial sweeteners may up diabetes risk. Many believe that it helps you minimise your calorie intake, but it has also been proven that instead of cutting back calories, it makes you eat more. Now, new research has linked artificial sweeteners with long-term weight gain and increased risk of obesity. The findings showed that artificial sweeteners or non-nutritive sweeteners may have negative effects on metabolism, gut…

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Your speech may hold clues as to whether you are at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

Your speech may, um, help reveal if you’re uh … developing thinking problems. More pauses, filler words and other verbal changes might be an early sign of mental decline, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease, a study suggests. Researchers had people describe a picture they were shown in taped sessions two years apart. Those with early-stage mild cognitive impairment slid much faster on certain verbal skills than those who didn’t develop thinking problems. “What we’ve discovered here is there are aspects of language that are affected earlier than we thought,”…

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Sugar intake in pregnancy ups allergy, asthma risk in baby

High intake of sugar during pregnancy may increase the risk of allergy and asthma in the baby, a study has found. While some research has reported an association between a high consumption of sugar-containing beverages and asthma in children, the relation between maternal sugar intake during pregnancy and allergy and asthma in the offspring has been little studied. Researchers from University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) in the UK collected data from almost 9,000 mothers who were pregnant in the early 1990s and their offspring. The study, published…

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