Out with the old school? The rise of ed tech in the classroom

There was a time classrooms were a bastion of tradition, dominated by blackboards, chalk and textbooks. But the rapid evolution of technology means there’s a need to advance how education is delivered to young people. Schools now spend £900m on education technology every year, and it is estimated the global market will be worth £129bn by 2020. It’s making a difference – the 2017 consumer digital index [pdf] suggests that 97% of those aged 15–24 in the UK have basic digital skills – a 4% improvement on 2015. Among the emerging “edtech” ventures…

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The rise and revival of the ancient Rampuri cuisine

Say Rampur, and one in all likelihood be reminded of Rampuri Chaaku of Bollywood fame (the long, foldable switchblade that the villain would often carry, and which the Indian government had to ban after Dawood Ibrahim became big). The town, which was once home to poets like Mirza Galib, is today a relatively obscure place in India’s modern geographical layout. But this was not always the case. There was a time when Rampur, a free kingdom tucked behind the lush boundaries of Lucknow, was the place to be in for…

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Hereditary breast, ovarian cancer on rise in India

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases are on the rise in India, three times more than in western countries, said a study by leading bioinformatics firm Strand Life Sciences Ltd on Tuesday. “Breast cancer gene mutations in the Indian population are three times more in India than in the western world due to inherited genetic disorders,” revealed the study based on diagnosis of breast and ovarian cancer patients in the country. Though the breast cancer gene was not considered a major threat when it was identified by genomics pioneer Mary-Claire…

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No Ordinary Cooks: The Rise and Decline of the Tradition of Khansamas

It is somewhat ironical that in this day of celebrity chefdom, khansamas, the original traditional professional cooks or chefs in many parts of the country, should have so totally disappeared. But this disappearance is perhaps inevitable. The khansamas were a product of a feudal India, of the British Raj, and while their legacy lived on for many decades post-Independence, and post the abolition of the privy purses which dealt a death blow to feudalism in many ways, in the post Liberalisation world, it was inevitable that this legacy would wane which is…

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No Ordinary Cooks: The Rise and Decline of the Tradition of Khansamas

It is somewhat ironical that in this day of celebrity chefdom, khansamas, the original traditional professional cooks or chefs in many parts of the country, should have so totally disappeared. But this disappearance is perhaps inevitable. The khansamas were a product of a feudal India, of the British Raj, and while their legacy lived on for many decades post-Independence, and post the abolition of the privy purses which dealt a death blow to feudalism in many ways, in the post Liberalisation world, it was inevitable that this legacy would wane which is…

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